To Watch and Be Watched

To Watch and Be Watched, An Original Piece for Dancers and Actors
Tulane University Department of Theatre
Written and Directed by Gary Gordon and Acty Tang
Scenic Design by Diana Cupsa

This production was developed using text and music created by South African artists. It tells the story of a writer struggling with his life and his work. The movement and text bring the audience into the thoughts and emotions inside the writers head as he deals with issues of the loss of his home and his lover and his current inability to write. The set was very minimal and the concept was very abstract. I used the lighting to create a very surreal space with a fantastical, dream-like quality.

Tulane University Theatre Department

In this scene, the Writer struggles with his inability to write.  His thoughts are represented by the dancers, who taunt him by throwing blank sheets of paper in the air and at him.  The lights move subtly during this scene that represents the chaos inside the Writer’s mind.

The Writer’s thoughts continue to taunt him.  I highlighted the thoughts as they gathered in a tight configuration and chased the writer around the stage.

The Writer dreams up a fantastical bird, but his negative thoughts take over as he realizes that his magical bird is only a fantasy and could not really exist.  I took the color out of the lights in this cue to represent his transition from fantasy back to reality.

The Writer dreams up a fantastical bird, but his negative thoughts take over as he realizes that his magical bird is only a fantasy and could not really exist.  I took the color out of the lights in this cue to represent his transition from fantasy back to reality.

The Writer’s thoughts are separated.  The voices of reason dance in front as the creative thoughts linger in the back.  The lighting serves to visually differentiate the two kinds of thoughts.

The Writer explores his memories as they are projected in front of him.  The projector lights the Writer while the other lighting on stage is dim, so that the others  appear only as shadows.

The Writer comes to terms with his losses and says goodbye to the bird and his house, represented by a glass house.   He also begins to write again.   The lighting gives the scene a feeling of ascension.   Additionally,  lighting the inside of the glass house allows the writing on its walls to be seen